Apscuf Agreement

“I believe that the agreement is in principle a historic step forward in the process of creating a common vision of how our universities should work to best serve our students,” said Ken Mash, PRESIDENT of APSCUF. According to a joint press release from APSCUF and PASSHE, the negotiators reached an “agreement in principle” on 18 September for the faculty contract between PASSHE and APSCUF. The last contract expired on June 30. However, the treaty will remain in force until a new collective agreement is ratified, he said. The agreement followed a marathon five-day interest rate negotiation (BWI) meeting, which began on September 14. According to PASSHE, IBB is the strategy negotiator, which focuses on cooperation rather than traditional exchanges of contractual proposals. Negotiators agreed on the principle of the new faculty contract on September 18 between the National Higher Education System (PASSHE) and the Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties Association (APSCUF). Details of the agreement will not be published until the formal treaty is ratified and approved, but President Dr. Kenneth Mash said the agreement is in principle an excellent presentation of how universities should work to serve students. The Pennsylvania State Education System (PASSHE) and the Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties Association (APSCUF) announced Thursday that the organizations` negotiators had reached an “agreement in principle” for a new faculty contract.

According to the press release issued by PASSHE, legal advisors from APSCUF and the government system will continue to finalize the language before an interim agreement is available to APSCUF members, and the ratification process will begin after the language is over. PASSHE Board chair Cindy Shapira said the agreement was another important step in overhauling the system. Since mid-May, PASSHE and APSCUF negotiators have met at Dixon University Center in Harrisburg for 21 days to discuss the contract. The old faculty contract expired on June 30; it will remain in force until a new treaty is ratified. “Through deep cooperation from the beginning, the negotiating teams have achieved a result that puts students first, appreciates the important work of our committed faculty and takes a more important step to meet our financial challenges,” said Greenstein. “Along the way, we have built lasting relationships that will serve us well, while working together to create a better future for our students, our 14 universities and our Commonwealth.” PASSHE Chancellor Dan Greenstein welcomed the decision: “On the way to us, we have built lasting relationships that will serve us well, while working together to create a better future for our students, our 14 universities and our Commonwealth,” he said. At the start of the negotiations, Kara Laskowski, chairman of the apSCUF chapter, said: “The BWI must be a better way to conduct the negotiations.” Chancellor Dan Greenstein praised the progress made by the APSCUF and PASSHE negotiating teams and said they had succeeded in prioritizing students and building a lasting partnership that will be useful in the future. In a press release issued by PASSHE on September 19, Board of Governors President Cindy Shapira said pasSHE and APSCUF have achieved the ultimate goal: to focus on students. “The main components are fair,” Mash said. “They deal with a number of faculty topics and create a solid foundation for the future of public higher education in Pennsylvania.” Allison is a senior converged journalism major in her first year at The Rocket contributor as news editor.


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